women: custodial sentences debate briefing

The Prison Reform Trust provided a number of peers with briefings for a debate in the House of Lords on 26 June when Baroness Healy put a ‘question for short debate’ - To ask Her Majesty’s Government what measures are being taken to reduce the number of women given custodial sentences. As well as to Baroness briefing], and Prison Reform Trust’s work was also mentioned in the following HL debate on the same day about when Baroness Tyler of Enfield asked Her Majesty’s Government whether they have plans to improve how local services respond to women with multiple and complex needs.

Westminster hall debate briefing

Prison Reform Trust briefing on the Westminster Hall debate on the  police response to domestic violence.

The debate was held on Thursday 10th April 2014, you can download the briefing here

new resource - international good practice report

Smartjustice for women film

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community justice for women

Thousands of vulnerable women who have committed non-violent offences are unnecessarily sent to prison each year in England and Wales. Just before Christmas, the House of Lords amended the Crime and Courts Bill to ensure that appropriate community-based options for women should be provided across England and Wales. Unfortunately, the amendment was struck out in the House of Commons, on 5 February.

Listen to PRT's director, Juliet Lyon and Joy Doal of the Anawim women's centre, talking on BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour about the vital role community sentences have in reducing women's reoffending.

 

Related Content

transforming lives

Too many women in the UK are still being sent to prison instead of receiving community sanctions and targeted support to address the causes of their offending, according to a leading women’s voluntary organisation.

The women’s prison population doubled between 1995 and 2010. Most women in prison serve short prison sentences for non-violent offences and many have themselves been victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse. In 2011 the Soroptimist UK Programme Action Committee resolved to work with the Prison Reform Trust to reduce women’s imprisonment.

Now a wealth of information gathered by 139 Soroptimists clubs across the UK has been distilled into a report that is intended to spur national and local governments into action. The report recommends the development in England and Wales of a cross-government strategy for women’s justice, led by the Minister for Female Offenders. Recommendations for improvements to the oversight of women’s justice in Scotland and Northern Ireland are also highlighted.

Find out more and download the report by clicking here.

 

Brighter Futures

brighter futuresSupporting women at an early stage to help them address the causes of their offending would cut crime, reduce women’s prison numbers and save the taxpayer money, according to a new briefing  by the Prison Reform Trust.

Brighter Futures, supported by the Pilgrim Trust, profiles innovative approaches to reducing women’s offending and calls for the development of coordinated services that bring together police, health, women’s services and local authorities to help women turn their lives around.

Click here to read more and download


MPs say Government must act now to divert women from crime and reduce women’s imprisonment

The influential Justice Select Committee has condemned the unacceptable delays in implementing the Corston Report published in 2007 and stated clearly that prison is an expensive and ineffective way of dealing with many women offenders who do not pose a significant risk of harm to public safety. The report highlights that, despite some progress in recent months, women offenders continue to be an afterthought in the government’s justice reforms.

Commenting on the Justice Committee’s report Women offenders: after the Corston Report, Juliet Lyon, director of the Prison Reform Trust said:
“Over six years, successive governments have failed to implement the sensible recommendations made by Baroness Corston in her review commissioned after the deaths of six young women in Styal prison. During these years, as before, tens of thousands of vulnerable women, often victims themselves of serious crimes, domestic violence and sexual abuse, have trudged through prison gates to serve short meaningless sentences for petty offences, shoplifting and receiving stolen goods. So many lives have been blighted and money wasted by the casual cruelty of delays and failure to join up solutions across government. The Justice Select Committee calls now for “political courage” and leadership to go further to divert women from crime and faster to reduce women’s imprisonment."
Jenny Earle, director of the Prison Reform Trust’s Programme to Reduce Women’s Imprisonment, said:
“Effective community alternatives for women, which tackle the underlying causes of their offending, face a very uncertain future due to the upheaval of probation services. Many women’s centres are already experiencing reduction or loss of funding and are struggling to survive financial insecurity. The government must act swiftly and decisively to assure the future of these women’s services.”

This report comes at a critical time in the contracting out of supervision and rehabilitation services for offenders. The planned extension of statutory supervision to offenders imprisoned for less than 12 months will disproportionately affect women as most women serve very short prison sentences. But as the report says “the government’s proposals for Transforming Rehabilitation have clearly been designed to deal with male offenders. Funding arrangements for provision for women appear to be being shoehorned into the payment by results programme”.

The Prison Reform Trust has been working with its supporters to achieve statutory underpinning for a distinct approach to women offenders and welcomes last week’s government amendment to the Offender Rehabilitation Bill. This will require the Secretary of State for Justice to ensure that arrangements for supervision and rehabilitation services comply with the public sector equality duty “as it relates to female offenders”.

The report’s conclusion that “tackling women’s offending is not just a matter for the justice system” points the way to where solutions lie. The involvement of health services is especially important, however the Committee found that mental health provision remains remarkably poor. Liaison and diversion schemes have a key role to play in improving outcomes for women in the justice system and we will be working to ensure they are tailored to the needs of vulnerable women.

Juliet Lyon said:

“Most of the solutions to women’s offending lie outside prison walls in treatment for addictions and mental health problems, protection from domestic violence and coercive relationships, secure housing, debt management, education, skills development and employment. Community sentences enable women to take control of their lives, care for their children and address the causes of their offending.

“The government should take inspiration from the recent success in youth justice policy, with the Youth Justice Board working with allied agencies to achieve a substantive drop in first time entrants into the youth justice system, and in child custody.”

women and alternative sentencing

Jenny Earle, director of PRT’s Programme to Reduce Women’s Imprisonment, took part in a panel discussion on Woman’s Hour which broadcast a special programme examining alternatives to prison for low-risk women offenders on Wednesday 19 June.

The programme featured moving accounts from women who have received support from Anawim women’s centre in Birmingham, and the panel included Joy Doal of Anawim and Alan Beith MP, Chair of the Justice Select Committee. The Minister Helen Grant MP was also interviewed and expressed her support for community sentences and the work of women’s centres. 

You can listen to the show here


Soroptimists call on MPs and Peers to reduce women’s imprisonment

Soroptimist (UK), in partnership with the Prison Reform Trust, will today (Thursday 25 April 2013) launch an action pack at a reception in the House of Commons to support the Soroptimists’ initiative to reduce women’s imprisonment in the UK.

The reception is being held as figures just released by the Ministry of Justice show that:
  • Nearly half of female prisoners (48%) surveyed report having committed offences to support someone else’s drug use, compared to 22% of male prisoners
  • Women in prison are nearly twice as likely to be identified as suffering from depression as male prisoners (65% versus 37%), and more than three times as likely as women in the general population (19%)
  • Women in prison suffering from the combination of anxiety and depression are significantly more likely to be reconvicted in the year after release from custody compared to female prisoners without such symptoms (this relationship is not found amongst male prisoners)
Speakers at the reception include: Lord McNally, Minister of State for Justice and Deputy Leader of the House of Lords; Lord Woolf, former Lord Chief Justice, chair of the Prison Reform Trust; Baroness Helena Kennedy of the Shaws QC, FRSA; Jan Hemlin, UKPAC chair; and Juliet Lyon CBE, Prison Reform Trust director.

Soroptimist International is an organisation that works to improve the lives of women and girls worldwide. It has a membership of approximately 90,000 women in over 3,000 clubs in 127 countries and it is the only women’s service organisation with general consultative status at the United Nations.

The Soroptimist UK Programme Action Committee resolved to mount a campaign to reduce women’s imprisonment across the UK working in partnership with the Prison Reform Trust. This ties in with their flagship project Violence Against Women - Stop it Now, on which a detailed analysis of the work done, club by club, is presented annually to the Home Secretary, ministers and the government Equalities Office.

This innovative partnership is timely. The government has recently published a strategy on women’s justice and announced the establishment of an Advisory Board, chaired by the Justice Minister Helen Grant, to help shape future policy and drive through reform. The Scottish government has committed to transforming women’s justice in Scotland and there are proposals in Wales and Northern Ireland for improved provision for female offenders.

Approximately 13,500 women are sent to prison each year in the UK, and the number of women in prison has increased significantly over the past decade. This is despite a widespread consensus, based on evidence, that community solutions that address the causes of women’s offending are more effective than prison in reducing crime and minimising the cost to society.

More than eight out of ten of sentenced women entering prison have been convicted of non-violent offences. Many have young children. Many have themselves been the victims of serious crime, including domestic violence, sexual abuse and rape.

Mental health problems, drug and alcohol addiction and self-harm are also very common. In the 12 months ending June 2012, women accounted for 31% of all self-harm incidents in prison in England and Wales despite representing only 5% of the prison population.

Today’s event in Westminster will bring together senior Parliamentarians, policymakers and representatives from each Soroptimist region across the UK to raise awareness of women’s justice reform and support members to take action locally.

The action pack contains facts and figures about women’s justice and other useful resources, and suggests steps Soroptimists can take to help end the unnecessary imprisonment of women who are not a threat to the public, and enable them instead to tackle the causes of their offending.

Information gathered by clubs about what is happening locally in police stations, courts, probation services and women centres will fill critical gaps in the national picture of the state of women’s justice, serving to increase our understanding of the drivers to custody for women as well as highlighting good practice.

The evidence received from clubs will be published in a report on the state of women’s justice across the UK in 2014, which will be presented to Ministers and policy makers.  

Commenting on the Soroptimists’ campaign to end the unnecessary imprisonment of women in the UK, Jan Hemlin Chair, Soroptimist UK Programme Action Committee, said:
“The Soroptimists are uniquely placed to gather much-needed information and add a strong voice from communities across the UK to press for, and achieve long-awaited change. We have learned of the exponential increase in women’s prison numbers in recent years, with about 13,500 women now sent to prison each year across the UK. Most are imprisoned for non-violent offences. Our members are committed to ensuring more constructive responses across the country to women who come into contact with the criminal justice system, many of whom are involved in non-violent, petty offending and have been victims themselves.”
Patricia Black, President, Soroptimist International of Great Britain and Ireland, said:
“I know that Soroptimist members across the UK have been horrified by the statistics presented on the imprisonment of women. If there is a way forward which can help women to change their lives for the better, if there is an alternative for some to being imprisoned, then surely we can provide a voice on this issue.”
Juliet Lyon, Director, Prison Reform Trust, said:

“The Soroptimists have an invaluable role to play, and the capacity to succeed, both in gathering information across the UK and achieving much needed reform. Most of the solutions to women’s offending lie outside prison walls in treatment for addictions, mental health and social care, safe housing, debt management and employment and skills.”

 

 

 

 

 

Building on the work of the Women’s Justice Taskforce, which culminated in the publication of Reforming Women’s Justice in 2011, the Prison Reform Trust is pleased to announce the start of its three-year programme to reduce women’s imprisonment in the UK, supported by the Pilgrim Trust. Drawing on the success of Out of Trouble, the programme to reduce child and youth imprisonment which contributed to the 40% reduction in the child custody since 2008, and Care not Custody, focusing on mental health and learning disabilities in the criminal justice system, the programme's strategy will include: mapping arrest and custody patterns across the UK; targeting high custody areas; promoting alternatives to custody and examples of good and interesting practice; and raising awareness of the complex factors affecting women’s offending and supporting the development of more effective responses to it.

Led by programme director Jenny Earle, we will work constructively with national and local government, the Soroptimists, National Council of Women and the National Federation of Women’s Institutes and other organisations committed to improving justice for women.

For more information on the issues that this programme will be tackling download this leaflet, and read the latest stats on women in prison.

To contact us email womensprogramme@prisonreformtrust.org.uk

Public say top three solutions to women's offending lie in health not criminal justice

  • A YouGov opinion poll, launched today by the Prison Reform Trust, reveals strong support for public health measures to tackle women’s offending
  • Dame Elish Angiolini, chair of the Scottish Commission on Women Offenders, to deliver Prison Reform Trust lecture tonight on Reforming Women’s Justice
  • Prison Reform Trust launches three year strategy to reduce the imprisonment of women in the UK
A YouGov opinion poll, launched today by the Prison Reform Trust, reveals strong support for public health measures to tackle women’s offending. Treatment for drug addiction, help to stop alcohol misuse, and mental healthcare, were the top three solutions to get public backing for reducing offending by women who commit non-violent crimes.

The poll of 1,552 people across Britain reveals:
  • Nearly seven out of ten people polled (69%) believe treatment for drug addiction would be effective at reducing the risk of offending
  • 68% thought help to stop alcohol misuse would be effective
  • 62% believe mental health care would be effective.
The poll also reveals that getting out of debt was considered effective by 61% of people surveyed, supervision and support centres for women serving community sentences were seen as effective by 54%, and making amends to victims was considered effective by 53%.

Imprisonment was considered the seventh most effective way of addressing women’s offending and was backed by 52% of people surveyed.

The poll findings come as data just released by the Ministry of Justice shows that the rate of self-harm for female prisoners is over ten times higher than that for men (F: 2,104 self harm incidents per 1,000; M: 194 incidents per 1,000 male prisoners). Over half the women in prison report having suffered domestic violence and 1 in 3 has experienced sexual abuse. Around half of women leaving prison are reconvicted with one year of release. This figure rises to over 60% for those women serving a short sentence of 12 months or less.

The Prison Reform Trust is launching these poll results on the day that Dame Elish Angiolini delivers the Prison Reform Trust Lecture 2012 on Reforming Women’s Justice. Dame Elish is the former Lord Advocate of Scotland, the highest law officer in the Scottish legal system. She most recently chaired the Commission on Women Offenders in Scotland, which found that Scotland’s women’s prison Cornton Vale was not “fit for purpose” and recommended a radical overhaul of the system. In response to the Commission’s recommendations, the Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill has confirmed that the Scottish government will identify “suitable alternatives to Cornton Vale, leading to its replacement”.

Elish Angiolini was tasked by the Scottish government with finding more effective outcomes for the population of women offenders in Scotland; a population that has more than doubled over the last ten years. In the lecture she will explain the thinking behind her call for radical change to the systems in place in Scotland and the demolition of the national woman's prison there, of the need to abandon easy slogans of "tough or soft" on crime and to replace the soundbites with what works.

Dame Elish Angiolini will say:
In a long history of pretty meaningless sound bites "short, sharp shock" at least has the merit of being an attractive display of an alliteration. That is its only value. Far from having a deterrent effect, the short sentence has the impact of inoculating women offenders from any deterrent value of imprisonment. Neither are these sentences suitable as a refuge from the harsh reality of life outside for some badly damaged women. Prison needs to stop being the default position because of inertia in finding robust and effective alternatives in the community. It is time to abandon the fragmented efforts at tackling the profound underlying problems propelling so many women in Scotland and elsewhere into prison and adopt a cohesive and coherent approach.
The lecture, which will be attended by around 700 PRT Friends and supporters and allied civic society groups, will be an opportunity to consider the lessons from Scotland for women’s justice reform in England and Wales and Northern Ireland. The coalition government in Westminster has acknowledged the distinct needs of women offenders and is expected to publish a strategy on women’s justice by the end of the year. Helen Grant MP, the newly appointed minister for women in the criminal justice system, will be attending the lecture at Friends House in London as the special guest of the Prison Reform Trust.

Commenting in response to a Parliamentary Question on women offenders by Amber Rudd MP on 13 November, the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice Rt Hon Chris Grayling MP, said:
One of the first prisons I visited was Holloway. I saw at first hand the very different challenge we face with women offenders. One of the earliest steps I took was to separate ministerial responsibility for men and women in our prisons, asking the Under-Secretary of State for Justice, my hon. Friend the Member for Maidstone and The Weald (Mrs Grant) to take on the role of Minister with responsibility for women in prisons, and to look at whether we are getting the regime right and how we should adapt it to reflect the very different challenges we face with women in our prisons.
Mumsnet – the UK’s busiest social network for parents – will be holding a discussion with its members from midday on Monday about women and prison.

The lecture will be broadcast live online at the PRT website from 7.00pm

The lecture marks the official launch of the Prison Reform Trust’s three year strategy to reduce the unnecessary imprisonment of women in the UK. Supported by the Pilgrim Trust and PRT Friends, the strategy builds on the work of the Women’s Justice Taskforce which reported in 2011.

Too many women are imprisoned every year for non-violent offences. About 13,500 women are sent to prison in the UK every year. At any one time there are around 4,650 women in our prisons. The average annual cost of a women’s prison place is £56,415, compared to £10,000 - £15,000 for an intensive community order

Women’s offending is commonly linked to underlying mental health problems, drug and alcohol misuse, financial difficulties and debt, and experience of domestic violence and sexual abuse. Many women who offend spent time in local authority care as children. Some are victims of human trafficking and are coerced into offending. Most women in prison have dependent children.

Over the next three years we will work with our partners including the Soroptimists, the National Council of Women, and the National Federation of Women’s Institutes, and allied charities and organisations, PRT Friends and supporters committed to reforming justice for women, and achieving change.

Commenting, Juliet Lyon, director of the Prison Reform Trust, said:
Most women in prison are serving short sentences for petty persistent offending and non-violent crime. Most have been victims of serious crime, domestic violence and sexual abuse. Solutions to women’s offending lie, not behind bars, but in effective treatment to beat addictions to drugs and drink, mental health care and help to get out of debt. The public understand this, now it is up to government to put things right.
Jenny Earle, the director of the new PRT programme to reduce women’s imprisonment, said:
Because women are such a small minority of the prison population they are easily overlooked. But change is also more easily achieved on a smaller scale. By working constructively with government, and together with our partners - including the National Federation of Women’s Institutes, the Soroptimists and the National Council of Women, and other organisations committed to reforming justice for women - we will ensure more effective responses to women’s offending.

SmartJustice for Women

What’s the Problem?
In the last decade the women’s prison population has gone up by 33%. There are currently 4,267 women in prison.

Why are Women in Prison?
Almost two-thirds of women are in prison for non-violent offences

What kinds of women are in prison?
One in four women in prison were in local authority care as a child. Nearly 40% of women in prison left school before they were 16, almost one in 10 were 13 or younger.
Over half the women in prison have suffered domestic violence and one in three has experienced sexual abuse.

Why should I care?
This increased prison population has not increased public safety. 54% of women leaving prison are re-convicted within one year – for those serving sentences of less than 12 months this increases to 64%. For women who have served more than 10 previous custodial sentences the reoffending rate rises to 90%.

Who else is affected?
66% of women in prison have dependent children under 18. Each year it is estimated that more than 17,700 children are separated from their mother by imprisonment.

What should the government do?
It is widely accepted that the best way to reduce women's offending is in the community, by improving mental health services and tackling drug abuse.

We believe that reducing the women’s prison population through providing better alternatives to custody should be a government priority

news and publications

Too many women in the UK are still being sent to prison instead of receiving community sanctions and targeted support to address the causes of their offending, according to a leading women’s voluntary organisation.

The women’s prison population doubled between 1995 and 2010. Most women in prison serve short prison sentences for non-violent offences and many have themselves been victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse. In 2011 the Soroptimist UK Programme Action Committee resolved to work with the Prison Reform Trust to reduce women’s imprisonment.

Now a wealth of information gathered by 139 Soroptimists clubs across the UK has been distilled into a report that is intended to spur national and local governments into action. The report recommends the development in England and Wales of a cross-government strategy for women’s justice, led by the Minister for Female Offenders. Recommendations for improvements to the oversight of women’s justice in Scotland and Northern Ireland are also highlighted.

Download the report by clicking here.

Read the full story by clicking 'read more'.

Read more


A prison system built to hold young men is struggling to cope with the rapidly growing numbers of old, sick and disabled people behind bars, a new Prison Reform Trust report, supported by the Bromley Trust, reveals.

The report, launched at HMP Brixton today (Tuesday 28 October), comes the day before the Prisons Minister Andrew Selous MP is due to give evidence on older prisoners to the Justice Select Committee.

People aged 60 and over and those aged 50–59 are the first and second fastest growing age groups in the prison population. Between 2002 and 2014 there was an increase of 146% and 122% in the number of prisoners held in those age groups respectively. On 31 March 2014 there were 102 people in prison aged 80 and over. Five people in prison were 90 or older.

Ever-lengthening sentences mean people in prison are growing old and frail with high rates of unmet social care and support needs. Two in five (37%) of those over the age of 50 in prison have a disability.

Read more


Supporting women at an early stage to help them address the causes of their offending would cut crime, reduce women’s prison numbers and save the taxpayer money, according to a new briefing launched today by the Prison Reform Trust.


Brighter Futures, supported by the Pilgrim Trust, profiles innovative approaches to reducing women’s offending and calls for the development of coordinated services that bring together police, health, women’s services and local authorities to help women turn their lives around.

Read more


Nearly half of people in prison in England and Wales could be warehoused in 1,000-plus supersized jails under government plans to transform the prison estate, the latest edition of the Prison Reform Trust's Bromley Briefings Prison Factfile reveals.

A shorter summary version, Prison: The Facts, is available for iPad and iPhone on the App Store and for Android devices via Google Play.

Read more


A requirement that the particular needs of women offenders must be addressed in the provision of supervision and rehabilitation services is now included in the Offender Rehabilitation Bill and will be given the force of law when enacted.

The Offender Rehabilitation Bill was amended by the Government during the House of Lords third reading yesterday (9 July 2013) to require the Secretary of State to ensure that arrangements for supervision and rehabilitation services comply with the public sector equality duty “as it relates to female offenders”.  This will apply to public, private, and voluntary sector providers of offender services.

Read more


As the Justice Secretary announces 70 resettlement prisons, briefing finds budget cuts and overcrowding are leading to less purposeful activity, reduced regimes and more time in cell.

Massive cuts in prison staff and budgets are placing overcrowded prisons in England and Wales under unprecedented strain and undermining government plans to transform rehabilitation, the Prison Reform Trust's new iPad app Prison: The Facts, Bromley Briefings Online, reveals.

Read more


Women and alternative sentencing

24/06/2013 14:25:00

Jenny Earle, director of PRT’s Programme to Reduce Women’s Imprisonment, took part in a panel discussion on Woman’s Hour which broadcast a special programme examining alternatives to prison for low-risk women offenders on Wednesday 19 June.

The programme featured moving accounts from women who have received support from Anawim women’s centre in Birmingham, and the panel included Joy Doal of Anawim and Alan Beith MP, Chair of the Justice Select Committee. The Minister Helen Grant MP was also interviewed and expressed her support for community sentences and the work of women’s centres.

You can listen to the show here

Read more


The Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill has said better community alternatives to women’s imprisonment are a priority in the Scottish Government’s plans to reform women’s justice.

Speaking ahead of a reception in the Scottish Parliament this afternoon (Wednesday) to mark the initiative by the Soroptimists and the Prison Reform Trust to reduce women’s imprisonment across the UK and to publicise their action pack, he said:

“Reducing reoffending, improving the circumstances of women in prison and seeking better community-based alternatives to imprisonment for women continue to be priorities for the Scottish Government  – indeed, that’s why we established the Commission on Women Offenders.”

Read more


Soroptimist (UK), in partnership with the Prison Reform Trust, will today (Wednesday 15th May 2013) launch an action pack at a reception at the Pierhead in Cardiff to support their initiative to reduce women’s imprisonment across the UK.

More than eight out of ten of sentenced women entering prison have been convicted of non-violent offences. Many have young children. Many have themselves been the victims of serious crime, including domestic violence, sexual abuse and rape.

 

Read more


Soroptimist (UK), in partnership with the Prison Reform Trust, will today (Thursday 25 April 2013) launch an action pack at a reception in the House of Commons to support the Soroptimists’ initiative to reduce women’s imprisonment in the UK.

Click this link to find out more and download the pack

Read more


Commenting on the Justice Minister Helen Grant’s announcement in Parliament today of measures to provide a greater focus on the support and rehabilitation of female offenders, Juliet Lyon, director of the Prison Reform Trust, said:

The Minister’s announcement should be a catalyst for coordinated cross-government action to reduce women’s prison numbers. Over 10,000 women were sent to prison every year, most to serve short sentences for non-violent crimes. Many women in prison have themselves been the victims of serious crime, including domestic violence, sexual abuse and rape. Mental health problems, drug and alcohol addiction and self-harm are particularly common among women in prison. Each year, more than 17,000 children are separated from their mothers by imprisonment.

Read more


Most foreign national women in custody in England and Wales who have been trafficked into offending are not getting the help and support to which they are entitled as victims of crime, a University of Cambridge report reveals.

The report’s authors found violence, intimidation and rape were common experiences of the women, but evidence of their suffering was often overlooked and they did not receive the protection guaranteed to them as victims of human trafficking under international law. In only one of the cases of human trafficking identified by the researchers did victim disclosures result in a full police investigation in relation to the actions of the perpetrators.

Read more


Peers have backed an important amendment to the Crime and Courts Bill requiring contracts made with probation trusts to make "appropriate provision for the delivery of services to female offenders".

The amendment, drafted by the Prison Reform Trust with the assistance of Paul Cavadino, was moved by the Chair of the Prison Reform Trust, the former Lord Chief Justice Lord Woolf. It stated the need for programmes to prevent reoffending with "the particular needs of women in mind".

Read more



The Prison Reform Trust has recently provided evidence and a submission to the Justice Committee’s inquiry on women offenders, and the Scottish Prison Service’s consultation on women in custody.

Read our responses here


Read more