12% of prisoners released from custody in 2012/13 had no settled accommodation.

A lack of accommodation can also severely hinder former prisoners’ chances of finding employment. Almost one quarter of employers would not consider employing a homeless person.

Getting ex-prisoners into stable housing can act as a gateway to effective resettlement. Home Office research has found that prisoners who have accommodation arranged on release are four times more likely to have employment, education or training arranged than those who do not have accommodation in place.

A study by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development found that ex-offenders are the most disadvantaged of all the labour market. In 2010 only 12% of employers surveyed said that they had employed somebody with a criminal record in the past three years.

Around one in five employers (19%) said they did exclude or were likely to exclude ex-offenders from the recruitment process. In 2005, more than one in three (37%) employers said that they deliberately exclude those with a criminal record when recruiting staff.


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Feb3 03/02/2015 23:53:00 by tony
Disproportionate restrictions on the temporary release of prisoners are undermining opportunities for effective resettlement and rehabilitation and leading to growing frustration and resentment behind bars, a new report by the Prison Reform Trust reveals.

For many people in prison, particularly those who are serving long sentences, the chance to experience ROTL and open prison conditions are a pivotal part of the process of rehabilitation. They allow people to take responsibility through work and volunteering, establish contact with families and sort out housing needs; factors which contribute to their safe management and supervision in the community on release. read more...
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