12% of prisoners released from custody in 2012/13 had no settled accommodation.

A lack of accommodation can also severely hinder former prisoners’ chances of finding employment. Almost one quarter of employers would not consider employing a homeless person.

Getting ex-prisoners into stable housing can act as a gateway to effective resettlement. Home Office research has found that prisoners who have accommodation arranged on release are four times more likely to have employment, education or training arranged than those who do not have accommodation in place.

A study by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development found that ex-offenders are the most disadvantaged of all the labour market. In 2010 only 12% of employers surveyed said that they had employed somebody with a criminal record in the past three years.

Around one in five employers (19%) said they did exclude or were likely to exclude ex-offenders from the recruitment process. In 2005, more than one in three (37%) employers said that they deliberately exclude those with a criminal record when recruiting staff.


latest news and publications

Jun30 30/06/2017 16:50:00 by alex

Commenting on the findings of the Ministry of Justice's evaluation of the Sex Offender Treatment Programme, Peter Dawson, director of the Prison Reform Trust said:

"The results of an evaluation into sex offender treatment programmes published today are disappointing, but they do not mean that a whole group of people have been made more dangerous by doing the courses involved. The reoffending rate for sexual offending is much lower than for most other offences, and the rise in the reoffending rate for the whole cohort is from 8% to 10% (for sexual reoffending) measured over 8 years. The great majority of people released after serving a long sentence for sexual offending are not being convicted of further sexual offences.

"Decisions on whether to release people convicted of sex offences and how to manage them safely in the community depend on a wide range of factors, including the support available to them. Completing a particular course has only ever contributed to that judgement. That remains true.

"The range of courses available has already been adjusted to take account of these findings, but it is very important that individual prisoners are not disadvantaged because they voluntarily took part in the previous courses. In fact, their willingness to undergo lengthy and challenging courses, and the skills learned, should count in their favour, as just one factor amongst many in assessing risk and preparing for release."

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Jun2 02/06/2017 10:15:00 by alex

There should be a step change in the availability of release on temporary licence (ROTL) out of prisons to give more businesses the opportunity to employ prisoners in the community as part of preparation for their release, according to a new report published today (2 June) by the Prison Reform Trust.
 
The report, which details the findings of a two-year action learning project Out for Good based in HMP Brixton in south London, says there is "huge potential" to get more prisoners into jobs and training. It found a substantial number of employers both open to employing ex-offenders and willing to work with prisons to achieve this.

Against expectations, the report found it was not the attitudes of employers but national prison policy and practice which was the main barrier preventing opportunities for work and training from being seized.

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Feb28 28/02/2017 00:22:00 by tony
Bristol-based charity Life Cycle UK has won the Robin Corbett Award for Prisoner Rehabilitation 2017. Its innovative “Bike Back” project at HMP Bristol recreates the environment of a working bike shop in a prison. Here, an experienced mechanic, supported by skilled volunteers, teaches up to eight prisoners at a time (around 40 per year) the skills to completely refurbish broken bikes donated by the local community. read more...
Feb23 23/02/2017 10:25:00 by tony


Commenting on the prisons and courts bill, Peter Dawson, Director of the Prison Reform Trust, said:

"A statutory commitment to a system that rehabilitates is crucial to building safer communities. But the key task for legislation is to ensure that prisons are places in which that ambition can actually be realised. No future government should be allowed to preside over the decline in safety, decency and fairness that  we have seen in recent years. Achieving that will require a commitment to minimum standards, a clear statement of the responsibilities of prisons to those in their care, an independent prisons inspectorate appointed by and accountable to parliament, and a sustained effort to reduce chronic levels of overcrowding and curb sentence inflation." read more...
Oct4 04/10/2016 09:45:00 by alex

This month has seen a welcome focus on the performance of resettlement and supervision services for people in the community, following one of the biggest shakeups of probation in its history. 

The Public Accounts Committee published the findings of their inquiry; the Criminal Justice Joint Inspection published their report into resettlement support for short sentenced prisoners; and BBC Radio 4's File on 4 heard from families who have lost loved ones and have struggled to find answers; staff who are concerned that the service has been split in two, and Joy Doal at Anawim women's centre in Birmingham raised concerns that many vulnerable women were being recalled to prison for breaching probation orders, following short sentences for minor offences.

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