Latest news and publications

Aug16 16/08/2016 00:01:00 by alex

Commenting on the publication of today's report on HMP Chelmsford by HM Inspectorate of Prisons, director of the Prison Reform Trust, Peter Dawson said:

“This depressingly familiar report contains some important lessons for prison reform.  A prison built for 550 people holds 150 people more than it should, which is roughly the number the inspectors find locked behind their door. Accommodation that is modern and fit for purpose produces better results than when it’s nearly 200 years old. Too many prisoners housed in overcrowded, outdated establishments equals the failing system we currently have. Fewer prisoners and sensible investment equals a large part of the solution.”

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Jul28 28/07/2016 00:01:00 by alex

Commenting on the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman’s bulletin on prisoners with dementia, Peter Dawson, Incoming Director of the Prison Reform Trust, said: 

“This report highlights in distressing detail how imprisonment for many old, disabled people can amount to a double punishment. Prisoners are entitled to the same care in prison as they would receive in the community. They should not be subject to inhumane or degrading treatment due to a lack of preparedness by the prison service. The cross-party Justice Committee, the independent Prisons Inspectorate, and now the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman, have called on the government urgently to develop a national strategy to deal with the rapidly growing numbers of elderly and infirm people behind bars. The new justice secretary should heed their advice.”

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Jul19 19/07/2016 13:46:00 by alex

Commenting, incoming director of the Prison Reform Trust, Peter Dawson said:

"This report shows the justice secretary where she must begin on prison reform. Making prisons safe for everyone who lives and works in them is the absolute priority and the necessary bedrock for longer term change. She must urgently solve the mismatch between the demand on the prison service and the resources available to meet it. Realistically, that means reducing the number of prisoners so that prisons can return to being places where staff and prisoners can rebuild the relationships on which security, safety and rehabilitation all depend."

Download a copy of the full report by clicking here.

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Jul13 13/07/2016 00:01:00 by alex

The National Federation of Women’s Institutes (NFWI) and the Prison Reform Trust (PRT) welcome today’s announcement (Tuesday 12 July 2016) of the Government’s commitment to roll out liaison and diversion services in police custody suites and criminal courts across England. At a Care not Custody coalition event in Parliament, Health Minister Alistair Burt MP announced a £12m investment in further roll out of liaison and diversion services. Subject to evaluation full roll out should be achieved by 2020. 

Currently 50,000 people a year are assessed by liaison and diversion services following arrest, and almost 70% require mental health support. This vital new funding will extend NHS England liaison and diversion services from 50% population coverage to 75% by 2018.
 
This money will help people with mental ill health, learning disabilities or autism get the right care in the right place, supporting work between the police and the NHS.

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Jul8 08/07/2016 00:01:00 by alex

Older people released from prison are being set up to fail by a lack of adequate provision to meet their health and social care needs, according to a report published today by the Prison Reform Trust and Restore Support Network.

Limited and inconsistent support to help sort out housing, employment, personal finances and debt, drug and alcohol dependence, and re-establish family relationships is also undermining the effective resettlement of older prisoners and increases the risk of future offending.

The report, Social care or systematic neglect?, calls for the creation of a cross-government national strategy for meeting the health, social and rehabilitative needs of older people in prison and on release in the community.

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