Prison: the facts

Want to see what life is like for the people who live and work in the UK's overcrowded prison system?

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One to One

juliet lyon'One to One'  is a series of interviews broadcast on Radio 4 in which journalist Anita Anand discovers what drives people to pursue certain careers. 

Her first guest was PRT director, Juliet Lyon. In her early 20s Juliet fostered children, and went on to work in a school at the adolescent-unit of a psychiatric hospital. One patient was due to enter a young offenders' institution, so she went to see what it was like. Shocked by what she found, she knew she wanted to try and improve conditions within prisons.

Click this link to listen to the interview

 

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The Criminal Justice and Courts Bill will have its Third Reading in the House of Lords on Monday 10 November. During the Report Stage debate the government introduced amendments into the Bill to create a new public function entitled “recall adjudicator”. This new body would carry out the review of whether determinate sentenced prisoners released on licence and subsequently recalled to prison should be re-released. The function is currently carried out by the Parole Board.
 
The Prison Reform Trust and JUSTICE share concerns regarding the practical operation of the recall adjudicator and the legal basis for the decision to create the role. We have prepared a joint briefing in support of Lord Woolf’s amendment to Clause 8 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill to provide parliamentary oversight of arrangements for the recruitment, qualifications, training and costs of recall adjudicators.

Read a copy of the briefing here

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The British Medical Association have published a report on the vital role doctors have to play in preventing vulnerable children and young people ending up in custody
 
Young lives behind bars: The health and human rights of children and young people detained in the criminal justice system, sets out how doctors can recognise risk factors for future offending and seize the opportunity to intervene.

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A prison system built to hold young men is struggling to cope with the rapidly growing numbers of old, sick and disabled people behind bars, a new Prison Reform Trust report, supported by the Bromley Trust, reveals.

The report, launched at HMP Brixton today (Tuesday 28 October), comes the day before the Prisons Minister Andrew Selous MP is due to give evidence on older prisoners to the Justice Select Committee.

People aged 60 and over and those aged 50–59 are the first and second fastest growing age groups in the prison population. Between 2002 and 2014 there was an increase of 146% and 122% in the number of prisoners held in those age groups respectively. On 31 March 2014 there were 102 people in prison aged 80 and over. Five people in prison were 90 or older.

Ever-lengthening sentences mean people in prison are growing old and frail with high rates of unmet social care and support needs. Two in five (37%) of those over the age of 50 in prison have a disability.

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Government plans to hold young children and girls with older teenage boy in a proposed new 320-place “secure college” in Leicester were rejected by Peers in a tight vote in the House of Lords during the Report Stage (Day 2) debate on the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill. Peers voted by 186 to 185, majority one, to back a proposal to prevent the establishments housing girls or children under the age of 15. 

Read the full debate by clicking here.


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