Prison: the facts

Want to see what life is like for the people who live and work in the UK's overcrowded prison system?

 

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Download PRT's free app Prison: the facts for iPhone, iPad and Android

 

One to One

'One to One'  is a series of interviews broadcast on Radio 4 in which journalist Anita Anand discovers what drives people to pursue certain careers. 

Her first guest was PRT director, Juliet Lyon. In her early 20s Juliet fostered children, and went on to work in a school at the adolescent-unit of a psychiatric hospital. One patient was due to enter a young offenders' institution, so she went to see what it was like. Shocked by what she found, she knew she wanted to try and improve conditions within prisons.

Click this link to listen to the interview

 

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smartjustice for women

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Supporting women at an early stage to help them address the causes of their offending would cut crime, reduce women’s prison numbers and save the taxpayer money, according to a new briefing launched today by the Prison Reform Trust.


Brighter Futures, supported by the Pilgrim Trust, profiles innovative approaches to reducing women’s offending and calls for the development of coordinated services that bring together police, health, women’s services and local authorities to help women turn their lives around.

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Prisons That Work

31/03/2014 16:13:00

The Prison Reform Trust in partnership with leading thinktanks is providing platforms for the three main political parties to outline their justice proposals ahead of the 2015 general election. PRT believes there is scope for political consensus on prison reform. Parties wish to see decent, fair and purposeful prisons, a reduction in women's imprisonment, diversion and liaison services for people with mental health needs or learning disabilities and increased use of restorative justice.
 

You can read the first of these, ‘Prisons that work’, with Rt Hon Sadiq Khan MP, Shadow Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice by clicking this link




ed clark: austere cellBanning prisoners from receiving books in prison is just one of a number of mean and petty rules introduced by the secretary of state for justice that add to the stress and strain of imprisonment, while doing nothing to promote rehabilitation and personal responsibility.

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ed clark: walking cane and books in prison cellSome older people have committed serious crimes and it is important that justice is done, whether or not someone is aged 18 or 80.

But imprisonment for many old, disabled people can amount to a double punishment.

People aged over 60 are now the fastest growing age group in prison in England and Wales. As of last summer there were over 10,000 people aged 50 and over in prison, representing 12% of the total prison population. Many of this group have additional support needs, but caring for wheelchair-bound, doubly incontinent, often demented people is beyond what can be reasonably expected of prison staff.

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